The TCO of Software vs. Hardware-based Full Disk Encryption

White Papers

Ponemon Study - Phase II



Ponemon Institute
Independently conducted by Ponemon Institute LLC
Publication Date: April 2013

 

Part 1.
Introduction

This paper extends the findings of the Total Cost of Ownership for Full Disk Encryption (FDE), sponsored by WinMagic and independently conducted by Ponemon Institute published in July 2012, The purpose of this original research was to learn how organizations deploy full disk encryption solutions for desktop and laptop computers as well as the determination of total cost and benefits for organizations using this technology.1 A reanalysis of this research allows us to formulate new findings that compare the total cost of ownership of software versus hardware-based full disk encryption solutions.

About the previous study

Ponemon Institute surveyed 1,335 respondents in four separate country samples: the United States (US), United Kingdom (UK), Germany (DE) and Japan (JP) representing a variety of industry sectors. Respondents held bona fide credentials in IT, IT security or data protection, and had nearly 10 years of relevant experience on average. Key findings from this earlier research were:

  • Expected benefits of full disk encryption exceeded cost in all four countries by a factor ranging from 4 to 20 times cost.
  • TCO varied inversely by organizational size: The organizations with fewer than 50 employees had the highest TCO for full disk encryption.
  • TCO varied by industry. Heavily regulated industries such as financial services and healthcare had the highest ownership costs.
  • The most expensive component of TCO was the value of diminished user productivity incurred operating a desktop or laptop with encryption.

Disk encryption is important in mitigating the damage caused by data breaches, complying with privacy and data protection regulations and preserving brand and reputation. However, there are many approaches and strategies for deploying encryption across the enterprise. In order to make rational decisions regarding the optimum use of encryption, it is important to comprehend the total cost of ownership (TCO). This particularly applies to solutions believed to be free but that may have a significantly higher TCO than commercial products.

In this paper, we use the term hardware-based full disk encryption and self-encrypting drives (SEDs) interchangeably. Prior Ponemon Institute research shows that SEDs provide hardware-based data security, full disk encryption and enhanced secure erase capabilities.2 The OPAL storage specification provides a comprehensive architecture for putting storage devices such as SEDs under policy control as determined by a trusted platform host.

Our reanalysis of the TCO of software versus hardware-based full disk encryption consists of eleven components:

  1. licensing cost;
  2. maintenance cost;
  3. SED incremental cost;
  4. device pre-provisioning cost;
  5. device staging cost;
  6. value of tech time associated with password resets;
  7. end-user downtime associated with password resets;
  8. cost associated with re-imaging hard disks;
  9. end-user downtime associated with initial disk encryption;
  10. value of end-user time incurred operating a full disk encrypted computer; and
  11. value of tech time incurred for various administrative tasks requiring access to encrypted drives.

Cost differences between software and hardware FDE solutions center on four components in the TCO framework, as follows:

  • Licensing cost paid to software or hardware vendors on average per year
  • OPAL fees (only applicable to hardware-based full disk encryption
  • Value of end-user downtime associated with the initial encryption of the hard disk
  • Value of excess end-user time operating a full disk encrypted computer

The next section shows each cost component, comparing software and hardware-based FDE cost considerations. Our analysis also includes cost components where software and hardware-based FDE have identical cost implications.


Part 2.
Full Disk Encryption TCO Calculus

In this section, we analyze the individual components of TCO for full disk encryption. Our TCO analysis is conducted for four country samples on a per computer basis for one full year.3 All costs are expressed in U.S. dollars for purposes of comparability across countries. Table 1 reports key assumptions that we use in our calculations:

Table 1
Assumptions used in TCO calculus  US  UK  DE  JP
Fully loaded hourly cost of technician time incurred while handling computing devices* $36 $35 $41 $44
Fully loaded hourly cost of end-users $56 $64 $72 $59
Approximate useful life of laptops or desktops assigned to end-users in years 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.9
Average number of 8-hour workdays per year# 247.5 235 225 245

*Estimated values derived from Ponemon Institute’s 2011 Tracking Survey on Security Spending
#Estimated values from OECD labor statistics

Licensing cost

The average licensing costs for software and hardware FDE per annum are computed in Table 2. The average licensing cost, which is derived from one survey question, is divided by the useful life of the laptop or desktop computer in order to calculate cost per annum. As can be seen, this TCO component appears to be fairly consistent across country samples. Specifically, software licensing appears to be about three to four times more expensive than hardware licensing costs in all four countries.

Table 2
Assumptions about licensing cost US  UK  DE  JP
Approximate useful life of laptops or desktops assigned to end-users 3.0 3.1 3.0 2.9
Average licensing cost for hardware-based FDE products $7.4 $7.3 $7.4 $8.3
Average licensing cost for software-based FDE products $23.9 $22.6 $22.8 $25.2
Average licensing cost for hardware FDE, per annum $2.5 $2.3 $2.5 $2.9
Average licensing cost for software FDE, per annum $8.1  $9.8  $10.1 $8.4 
Difference between software and hardware FDE $5.6 $7.5 $7.6 $5.6

Annual maintenance cost

The average annual maintenance cost is expressed as a percentage of the total licensing cost, shown separately for software and hardware-based FDE. Using the estimated average licensing cost reported in the above table, we calculate the maintenance cost for four country samples in Table 3. The percentage of annual maintenance cost is derived from one survey question. Once again, extrapolated costs appear to be substantially higher for software versus hardware-based FDE – that is, five times more expensive for annual maintenance costs.

Table 3
Assumptions about annual maintenance cost US  UK  DE  JP
Annual maintenance as a percentage in licensing cost for hardware FDE 13% 14% 15% 14%
Annual maintenance as a percentage in licensing cost for software FDE 21% 22% 21% 21%
Average licensing cost for hardware-based FDE products $7.4 7.3 7.4 8.3
Average licensing cost for software-based FDE products $23.9 $22.6 $22.8 $25.2
Annual maintenance cost for hardware FDE $1.0 $1.0 $1.1 $1.2
Annual maintenance cost for software FDE $5.0 $5.0 $4.8 $5.3
Difference between software and hardware FDE $4.1 $4.0 $3.7 $4.1

OPAL fees4

Table 4 computes the incremental licensing fee for OPAL, which only applies to hardware-based encrypted drives or SEDs. As can be seen, we assume software-based full disk encryption does not entail any comparable fee.

Table 4
Special fee for OPAL US  UK  DE  JP
OPAL fee paid for hardware-based FDE $7.9 $6.8 $7.1 $7.7
OPAL fee paid for software-based FDE $0 $0 $0 $0
Difference between software and hardware FDE $7.9 $6.8 $7.1 $7.7

Pre-provisioning cost

Table 5 computes the cost associated with pre-provisioning an encrypted versus an unencrypted laptop or desktop computer. In this analysis, we assume software and hardware-based FDE will have the same productivity impact on pre-provisioning cost. Thus, incremental time calculated below is independent of the full disk encryption method deployed by respondents’ organizations.

Table 5
Incremental cost associated with the pre-provisioning of a full disk encrypted computer US UK DE JP
Tech time to pre-provision FDE computer 21.6 19.8 18.9 18.5
Tech time to pre-provision unencrypted computer 19.5 13 9.5 13.7
Incremental time difference (minutes) 2.1 6.8 9.4 4.8
Tech time cost per hour $36 $35 $41 $44
Tech time cost per minute $0.6 $0.6 $0.7 $0.7
Value of tech time to pre-provision FDE computer $1.3 $3.9 $6.4 $3.5
Difference between software and hardware FDE $0 $0 $0 $0

Staging cost

Table 6 computes the cost associated with the staging of an encrypted and unencrypted laptop or desktop computer. Here again, we assume software and hardware-based FDE will have the same productivity impact on staging cost.

Table 6
Incremental cost associated with the staging of a full disk encrypted computer US UK DE JP
Tech time to stage FDE computer 47.1 54.2 48.4 49.6
Tech time to stage unencrypted computer 27.1 22.4 23.9 26.3
Incremental time difference (minutes) 20 31.8 24.5 23.3
Tech time cost per hour $36 $35 $41 $44
Tech time cost per minute $0.60 $0.60 $0.70 $0.70
Value of tech time to stage FDE computer $12.00 $18.50 $16.70 $17.10
Difference between software and hardware FDE $0 $0 $0 $0

Tech cost for password resets

Table 7 computes the value of tech time associated with resetting passwords for both encrypted and unencrypted laptop or desktop computers. This analysis shows that it takes more tech time to perform a password reset for a full disk encrypted computer than a comparable unencrypted device. Similar to the previous analysis, we assume that the method of encryption (software versus hardware) has no impact on the productivity cost for password resets.

Table 7
Tech cost associated with password resets of a full disk encrypted computer US UK DE JP
  Tech time to reset passwords for FDE computer 19.8 18.2 22.1 20.4
Tech time to reset passwords for unencrypted computer 17.5 16.1 20.1 18
Incremental time difference (minutes) for each reset 2.3 2.1 2 2.3
Frequency of password resets per annum 3.3 3.1 2.8 3.1
Time incurred per annum (minutes) 7.5 6.5 5.6 7.3
Tech time cost per hour $36.00 $35.00 $41.00 $44.00
Tech time cost per minute $0.60 $0.60 $0.70 $0.70
Value of tech time to reset passwords on FDE computer per annum $4.50 $3.80 $3.80 $5.30
Difference between software and hardware FDE 0 0 0 0

User idle cost for password resets

Table 8 computes the cost of end-user idle time waiting for the resetting of passwords for both encrypted and unencrypted laptop or desktop computers. Our analysis reveals it takes more time, and therefore a longer wait, to perform a password reset for a full disk encrypted computer. With respect to the idle time resulting from password resets, the method of encryption (software versus hardware) has no impact on end- user productivity.

Table 8
User downtime associated with password resets of a full disk encrypted computer US UK DE JP
User time waiting for a password reset on a FDE computer 31.4 32.6 23.7 35.7
User time waiting for a password reset on an unencrypted computer 24.2 29.9 20.6 25.3
Incremental time difference (minutes) for each reset 7.2 2.6 3.1 10.4
Frequency of password resets per annum 3.3 3.1 2.8 3.1
Time incurred per annum (minutes) 23.8 8.1 8.9 32.7
User time cost per hour $56.00 $64.00 $72.00 $59.00
User time cost per minute $0.90 $1.10 $1.20 $1.00
Value of user time waiting for password resets on a FDE computer per annum $22.20 $8.60 $10.60 $32.10
Difference between software and hardware FDE $0 $0 $0 $0

Tech cost to encrypt after re-imaging

Table 9 computes the value of tech time encrypting a laptop or desktop computer after re-imaging a hard disk drive. Our survey results suggest that only a small percentage of computers are re-imaged each year. Further, our TCO framework assumes hardware-based FDE requires zero tech time to re-image a hard disk.

Table 9
Value of tech time to re-encrypt a computer after re-imaging a hard disk US UK DE JP
Percent of desktop or laptop computers re-imaged each year 15% 13% 11% 15%
Tech time to re-encrypt computer after re-imaging a hard disk 20.3 21.4 22 20.6
Total tech time to re-encrypt computer after re- imaging a hard disk per annum 2.94 2.86 2.49 3.01
Tech time cost per hour $36.00 $35.00 $41.00 $44.00
Tech time cost per minute $0.60 $0.60 $0.70 $0.70
Value of tech time to re-encrypt computer after re- imaging a hard disk per annum for software-based encryption $1.80 $1.70 $1.70 $2.20
Value of tech time to re-encrypt computer after re- imaging a hard disk per annum for hardware-based encryption $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00
Difference between software and hardware FDE $1.80 $1.70 $1.70 $2.20

User idle cost for initial encryption

Table 10 calculates the value of an end-user’s idle time waiting for the encrypted laptop or desktop computer. We estimate that this initial encryption task happens once during the useful life of the device. Hence, we divide the total estimated downtime by the useful life of the computer. This analysis of downtime associated with the initial encryption of the desktop or laptop’s disk shows marked differences between software and hardware-based FDE. We assume zero idle time and no incremental cost for end users of desktops or laptops with hardware-based encryption or SEDs.

Table 10
User downtime associated with the initial encryption of the hard disk US UK DE JP
Approximate useful life of computers in years 3 3.1 3 2.9
User downtime during the initial encryption for hardware FDE 0 0 0 0
User downtime during the initial encryption for software FDE 94.9 92.3 76.8 80.2
User downtime for hardware FDE, per annum 0 0 0 0
User downtime for software FDE, per annum 31.6 29.8 25.6 27.7
User time cost per hour $56.0 $64.0 $72.0 $59.0
User time cost per minute $0.9 $1.1 $1.2 $1.0
User downtime per annum 21.9 21.3 18.7 19.0
Value of user downtime during the initial encryption task for hardware FDE $0 $0 $0 $0
Value of user downtime during the initial encryption task for software FDE $30.0 $31.5 $31.2 $27.6
Difference between software and hardware FDE $30.0 $31.5 $31.2 $27.6

User excess operating cost

Table 11 reports the annualized value associated with the end-user’s excess time operating a computer during the workday. Excess time includes idle minutes starting up, hibernating and shutting down a laptop or desktop computer. We first determine the incremental time differences in the user’s operation of encrypted and unencrypted devices. We further analyze time differences for software and hardware-based FDE. This analysis of end-user productivity clearly shows marked differences between software and hardware FDE. Once again, we see software-based FDE as much more expensive than hardware-based FDE in terms of users’ productivity in the normal use of their desktops or laptops in the workplace.

Table 11
User excess time operating a computer with and without encryption US UK DE JP
User excess minutes per day incurred operating computer without encryption 1.9 1.9 1.8 1.9
User excess minutes per day incurred operating computer with hardware FDE 2 2.1 1.8 2.1
User excess minutes per day incurred operating computer with software FDE 3.3 3.8 3.4 3.1
Incremental excess time difference for hardware FDE 0.1 0.2 0 0.2
Incremental excess time difference for software FDE 1.4 1.9 1.6 1.2
Average number of workdays per year 247.5 235.0 225.0 245.0
User time cost per hour $56.0 $64.0 $72.0 $59.0
User time cost per minute $0.9 $1.1 $1.2 $1.0
Value of user excess time per day for hardware FDE $0.1 $0.2 $0.0 $0.2
Value of user excess time per day for software FDE $1.3 $2.0 $1.9 $1.2
Value of user excess time per annum for hardware FDE $23.1 $50.1 $0.0 $48.2
Value of user excess time per annum for software FDE $323.4 $476.3 $432.0 $289.1
Difference between software and hardware FDE $300.3 $426.1 $432.0 $240.9

Tech cost for providing special administration to encrypted drives

Table 12 summarizes our final TCO cost component for full disk encryption (both software and hardware combined). We first estimate the number of times each year that IT technicians are required to access locked computers containing an encrypted drive, but do not have the required token or other credentials. To analyze this cost, we calculate the total number of FDE computers issued and on hand. We then divide the total number of events by the total number of FDE computers to determine the probability that any one computer will require special services during the year. We then multiply this probability by the calculated value of tech time in minutes to determine cost. As can be seen, the full disk encryption method (software vs. hardware) does not impact costs associates with special administrative tasks.

Table 12
Special administration is required to access encrypted drives US UK DE JP
Times per year special administration is required to access encrypted drives 104.8 98.1 122.7 93.6
Total number of computers issued and on hand 7,788 5,678 7,421 6,693
Percentage of computers containing both software and hardware FDE 31% 26% 38% 29%
Total number of FDE computers issued and on hand 2,382 1,473 2,838 1,948
Probability that a given encrypted drive will require special administration per annum 4.4% 6.7% 4.3% 4.8%
Tech time incurred in special administration of encrypted drives 12.9 12.4 15.4 9.5
Tech time cost per hour $36.00 $35.00 $41.00 $44.00
Tech time cost per minute $0.60 $0.60 $0.70 $0.70
Value of tech time incurred in special administration of encrypted drives per annum $0.30 $0.50 $0.50 $0.30
Difference between software and hardware FDE $0 $0 $0 $0

Table 13 provides a recap of 11 total cost of ownership components, and a calculated difference between software and hardware-based FDE. Each panel shows cost estimates for one of four country samples on a per computer basis.

Table 13a.
US Sample Hardware FDE Software FDE Difference
Licensing cost 2.5 8.1 5.6
Annual maintenance 1.0 5.0 4.0
OPAL fee 7.9 - (7.9)
Tech cost to pre-provision computer 1.3 1.3 -
Tech cost to stage computer 12.0 12.0 -
Tech cost to reset passwords 4.5 4.5 -
Value of idle time for password resets 22.2 22.2 -
Tech cost to re-encrypt after re-imaging - 1.8 1.8
Value of idle time on initial encryption - 30.0 30.0
Value of excess time operating computer 23.1 323.4 300.3
Tech cost of special administration 0.3 0.3 -
Total $74.8 $408.6 $333.8
Table 13b.
UK Sample Hardware FDE Software FDE Difference
Licensing cost 2.3 9.8 7.5
Annual maintenance 1.0 5.0 4.0
SED Incremental cost 6.8 - (6.8)
Tech cost to pre-provision computer 3.9 3.9 -
Tech cost to stage computer 18.5 18.5 -
Tech cost to reset passwords 3.8 3.8 -
Value of idle time for password resets 8.6 8.6 -
Tech cost to re-encrypt after re-imaging - 1.7 1.7
Value of idle time on initial encryption - 31.5 31.5
Value of excess time operating computer 50.1 476.3 426.2
Tech cost of special administration 0.5 0.5 -
Total $95.5 $559.6 $464.1
Table 13c.
German Sample Hardware FDE Software FDE Difference
Licensing cost 2.5 10.1 7.6
Annual maintenance 1.1 4.8 3.7
SED Incremental cost 7.1 - (7.1)
Tech cost to pre-provision computer 6.4 6.4 -
Tech cost to stage computer 16.7 16.7 -
Tech cost to reset passwords 3.8 3.8 -
Value of idle time for password resets 10.6 10.6 -
Tech cost to re-encrypt after re-imaging - 1.7 1.7
Value of idle time on initial encryption - 31.2 31.2
Value of excess time operating computer - 432.0 432.0
Tech cost of special administration 0.5 0.5 -
Total $48.7 $517.8 $469.1
Table 13d.
Japanese Sample Hardware FDE Software FDE Difference
Licensing cost 2.9 8.4 5.5
Annual maintenance 1.2 5.3 4.1
SED Incremental cost 7.7 - (7.7)
Tech cost to pre-provision computer 3.5 3.5 -
Tech cost to stage computer 17.1 17.1 -
Tech cost to reset passwords 5.3 5.3 -
Value of idle time for password resets 32.1 32.1 -
Tech cost to re-encrypt after re-imaging - 2.2 2.2
Value of idle time on initial encryption - 27.6 27.6
Value of excess time operating computer 48.2 289.1 240.9
Tech cost of special administration 0.3 0.3 -
Total $118.3 $390.9 $272.6

Figure 1 illustrates the marked differences between software and hardware-based full disk encryption in four countries. Taken together, these results provide strong evidence that hardware-based FDE solutions provide a substantially lower total cost of ownership than comparable software-based solutions.

TCO of software and hardware-based full disk encryption for four country samples
Figure 1. TCO of software and hardware-based full disk encryption for four country samples

Part 3.
Methods

Table 14 summarizes the sample of responses used in the reanalysis of software and hardware-based FDE.5 As can be seen, the total number of individuals invited to participate in all four countries was 74,886 and ranged from 24,600 in the US to 14,701 in Japan. This resulted in total returns of 2,069. We then reduced the sample by 734 returns because of reliability checks and further screening criteria. This resulted a final sample of 425 in the US, 339 in the UK, 353 in Germany and 218 in Japan (totaling 1,355 bona fide respondents with an overall response rate of 1.78 percent.

We recognized that certain questions about the TCO of full disk encryption could require input or collaboration from others in the respondent’s organization. Hence, our administrative procedure allowed respondents to freeze6 the survey window in order to collect additional details or obtain feedback from other knowledgeable individuals if deemed necessary. About 45 percent of all surveys completed utilized this freeze procedure.

Table 14
  United States United Kingdom Germany Japan  
Sample response US UK DE JP Total
Sampling frame 24,600 18,701 16,884 14,701 74,886
Total returns 645 534 518 372 2,069
Rejected surveys 109 89 67 54 319
Screened surveys 111 106 98 100 415
Final sample 425 339 353 218 1,335
Response rate 1.73% 1.81% 2.09% 1.48% 1.78%

Table 15 shows the total years of relevant work experience for respondents in all four countries. As can be seen, respondents are highly experienced, ranging from 10.03 years in the UK to 8.99 years in Japan.

Table 15.
Total years of relevant experience (mean years) US UK DE JP
Total years of IT or security experience 9.82 10.03 9.56 8.99
Total years in current position years 5.6 4.89 6.07 5.55
Pie Chart 1. Respondent’s position level combined for four countries
Pie Chart 1. Respondent’s position level combined for four countries

Pie Chart 2 reports the approximate industry classification for respondents’ organizations. The top three industries include financial services (16 percent), health & pharmaceuticals (12 percent) and public sector organizations (10 percent). Financial services include companies in banking, investment management, brokerage, insurances, and credit card/payments. Health companies include health service providers, insurers, medical technologies, health IT and others. Public sector includes national and local government entities.

Pie Chart 2.  Industry classification of organizations combined for four countries
Pie Chart 2. Industry classification of organizations combined for four countries

Pie Chart 3 summarizes the organizational headcount of respondents’ organizations. About 47 percent of respondents’ companies have 1,000 or more employees. Approximately 27 percent of companies are small- to-medium sized businesses (SMBs) with headcount at or below 500 people.

Pie Chart 3. Organizational headcount (size) for four countries
Pie Chart 3. Organizational headcount (size) for four countries

Part 4.
Limitations and conclusion

Caveats

There are inherent limitations to survey research that need to be carefully considered before drawing inferences from findings. The following items are specific limitations that are germane to most web-based surveys.

  • Non-response bias:  The current findings are based on a sample of survey returns.  We sent surveys to a representative sample of individuals in IT and IT security located in four countries, resulting in a large number of usable returned responses. Despite non-response tests, it is always possible that individuals who did not participate are substantially different in terms of underlying beliefs or perceptions about data protection activities from those who completed the instrument.
  • Sampling-frame bias: The accuracy is based on contact information and the degree to which the sample is representative of individuals in the IT and IT security fields. We also acknowledge that the results may be biased by external events.
    We also acknowledge bias caused by compensating respondents to complete this research within a holdout period. Finally, because we used a web-based collection method, it is possible that non-web responses by mailed survey or telephone call would result in a different pattern of findings.
  • Self-reported results: The quality of survey research is based on the integrity of confidential responses received from subjects. While certain checks and balances can be incorporated into the survey process, there is always the possibility that certain respondents did not provide accurate responses.

Conclusion

The reanalysis of TCO provided in this paper finds substantial cost differences between software-based and hardware-based full disk encryption methods. As illustrated in Figure 1, cost differences are significant in all four countries studied. Table 13 reports Germany having the largest gap at ($454), while Japan has the smallest gap (at $261). The main source of differences between software and hardware FDE solutions concern IT tech time/labor, end-user productivity and licensing fees. As shown in our original study, irrespective of the method of full disk encryption deployed (software vs. hardware), its benefits outweigh TCO by a factor of 4 to 20 X (depending on the country sample).7

 


Appendix 1:
Detailed Survey Responses

The following survey questions were fielded in June 2012. Additional debriefing procedures were completed in late June and early July 2012. Respondents in all four countries were tested to determine the adequacy of their credentials and reliability of their responses.

Part 1. Screening questions

S1. Does your organization deploy full or whole disk encryption solutions for desktops and laptops? US UK DE JP
Yes 425 339 353 218
No 111 106 98 100
Total 536 445 451 318
 
S2. How familiar are you with self-encrypting drives (SED) and the Trusted Computing Group’s OPAL standards? US UK DE JP
Very familiar 129 92 93 37
Somewhat familiar 219 178 205 132
Not familiar 56 49 41 36
No knowledge 21 20 14 13
Total 425 339 353 218
 
  US UK DE JP
Final sample size 425 339 353 218
 

Part 2. Total cost of ownership

Q1. Approximately, what range best reflects the number of desktops and laptops used by employees in your organization for work-related purposes? Please exclude desktops and laptops that are owned by employees. US UK DE JP
< 50 7% 9% 7% 6%
50 to 100 9% 11% 10% 13%
101 to 500 9% 10% 11% 14%
501 to 1,000 14% 16% 13% 12%
1,001 to 5,000 15% 19% 15% 16%
5001 to 10,000 17% 16% 18% 16%
10,001 to 25,000 19% 14% 15% 13%
> 25,000 10% 5% 11% 10%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q2a. Does your organization deploy self-encrypting drives (SEDs)? US UK DE JP
Yes 36% 26% 40% 28%
No 64% 74% 60% 72%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q2b. At present, what range best reflects the percentage of desktops and laptops used by employees in your organization that are enabled with self-encrypting (SED) or OPAL-based disk drives? US UK DE JP
< 1% 65% 69% 60% 62%
1 to 5% 12% 23% 15% 21%
6 to 10% 6% 3% 12% 6%
11 to 20% 5% 2% 5% 7%
21 to 40% 6% 2% 3% 2%
41 to 60% 3% 1% 2% 1%
61 to 80% 2% 0% 2% 0%
81 to 99% 1% 0% 0% 1%
All drives (100%) 0% 0% 1% 0%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q2c. In the next 12 months, what range best estimates the percentage of desktops and laptops used by employees in your organization that are enabled with self-encrypting (SED) or OPAL-based disk drives? US UK DE JP
< 1% 49% 55% 52% 51%
1 to 5% 15% 17% 19% 24%
6 to 10% 12% 12% 14% 11%
11 to 20% 16% 11% 6% 6%
21 to 40% 2% 2% 3% 2%
41 to 60% 1% 0% 2% 2%
61 to 80% 2% 1% 1% 1%
81 to 99% 2% 1% 2% 2%
All drives (100%) 1% 1% 1% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q3. Approximately, what is the useful life of desktops and laptops used by employees in your organization? US UK DE JP
1 year 0% 0% 0% 1%
2 years 31% 28% 29% 33%
3 years 50% 45% 52% 50%
4 years 13% 16% 14% 12%
5 years 5% 8% 5% 3%
> 5 years 1% 3% 0% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q4a. What is the licensing cost or fee on a per desktop and laptop basis for hardware-based disk encryption solutions used by your organization? US UK DE JP
None 25% 26% 28% 25%
$1 to $5 24% 22% 29% 23%
$6 to $10 21% 26% 23% 21%
$11 to $15 14% 11% 4% 15%
$16 to $20 13% 12% 12% 11%
$21 to $30 2% 1% 0% 1%
$31 to $40 1% 2% 0% 2%
$41 to $50 0% 0% 2% 1%
> $50 0% 0% 2% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q4b. What is the licensing cost or fee on a per desktop and laptop basis for software-based disk encryption solutions used by your organization? US UK DE JP
None 0% 0% 0% 0%
$1 to $5 2% 0% 1% 0%
$6 to $10 3% 8% 5% 2%
$11 to $15 13% 15% 12% 13%
$16 to $20 25% 30% 28% 34%
$21 to $30 32% 21% 25% 23%
$31 to $40 19% 21% 18% 21%
$41 to $50 5% 5% 4% 6%
> $50 1% 0% 7% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q5. As a percentage to the upfront licensing cost or fee (indicated above), what range best reflects the annual maintenance cost for desktop or laptop disk encryption solutions used by your organization?  
Hardware-based encryption solutions US UK DE JP
< 1% 1% 0% 1% 0%
1 to 5% 19% 17% 14% 20%
6 to 10% 22% 24% 20% 21%
11 to 15% 25% 26% 29% 30%
16 to 20% 14% 13% 12% 13%
21 to 25% 10% 9% 12% 5%
26 to 30% 6% 5% 7% 5%
31 to 40% 1% 2% 2% 3%
41 to 50% 2% 3% 2% 2%
> 50% 0% 1% 1% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Software-based encryption solutions US UK DE JP
< 1% 0% 0% 0% 0%
1 to 5% 0% 0% 0% 1%
6 to 10% 11% 10% 12% 10%
11 to 15% 15% 21% 16% 19%
16 to 20% 31% 23% 33% 23%
21 to 25% 15% 16% 12% 21%
26 to 30% 17% 12% 13% 12%
31 to 40% 6% 10% 11% 8%
41 to 50% 5% 8% 3% 6%
> 50% 0% 0% 0% 0%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q6. Approximately, what is the incremental cost or fee on a per desktop and laptop basis for OPAL? US UK DE JP
None (we don’t use OPAL) 34% 41% 38% 37%
$1 to $5 10% 8% 6% 9%
$6 to $10 14% 19% 28% 16%
$11 to $15 25% 19% 13% 19%
$16 to $20 14% 8% 9% 14%
$21 to $25 2% 5% 5% 4%
> $25 1% 0% 1% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q7. What is your organization’s experience on password resets? Approximately, on a per desktop and laptop basis, how many password resets does your organization experience over a 12-month period? US UK DE JP
< 1 1% 0% 0% 0%
1 reset 12% 10% 14% 9%
2 resets 33% 41% 35% 31%
3 resets 23% 21% 27% 35%
4 resets 16% 12% 11% 15%
5 resets 8% 12% 10% 6%
6 to 10 resets 3% 2% 3% 1%
11 to 15 resets 3% 2% 0% 3%
> 15 resets 1% 0% 0% 0%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q8a. Over the past 12 months, how many employee- assigned desktop and laptop computers were lost or stolen? US UK DE JP
None 11% 12% 9% 10%
< 5 23% 25% 35% 26%
5 to 10 23% 27% 20% 26%
11 to 20 15% 14% 13% 24%
21 to 30 12% 10% 16% 8%
31 to 40 6% 5% 2% 3%
51 to 100 5% 3% 2% 0%
101 to 200 2% 1% 3% 1%
> 200 3% 3% 0% 2%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q8b. What percent of lost or stolen desktop and laptop computers over the past 12 months contained full or whole disk encryption? US UK DE JP
None 38% 45% 23% 37%
< 1% 5% 4% 9% 8%
1 to 5% 1% 2% 6% 5%
6 to 10% 2% 5% 6% 3%
11 to 20% 11% 9% 8% 5%
21 to 40% 8% 6% 5% 10%
41 to 60% 14% 11% 15% 12%
61 to 80% 5% 3% 2% 3%
81 to 99% 2% 3% 1% 2%
All drives (100%) 14% 12% 25% 15%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q9. Approximately, how many lost or stolen desktop and laptop computers over the past 12 months contained unencrypted (i.e., data in clear text) sensitive or confidential business information? US UK DE JP
None 35% 35% 32% 33%
< 10% 9% 7% 15% 11%
10 to 25% 10% 8% 18% 8%
26 to 50% 15% 14% 16% 13%
51 to 75% 11% 10% 12% 14%
76 to 100% 20% 26% 7% 21%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q10a. Did any of these lost or stolen desktop or laptop computers result in a data breach incident requiring notification to individuals (a.k.a. data breach victims) as required by laws and regulations. US UK DE JP
Yes 36% 7% 27% 5%
No 50% 78% 60% 89%
Unsure 14% 15% 13% 6%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q10b. Approximately how many individual records were lost or stolen? Sum across all data breach incidents. US UK DE JP
< 100 3% 6% 5% 8%
101 to 1,000 23% 25% 36% 25%
1,001 to 5,000 25% 31% 36% 25%
5,001 to 10,000 29% 21% 18% 26%
10,001 to 50,000 15% 14% 5% 14%
50,001 to 100,000 4% 3% 0% 1%
> 100,000 1% 0% 0% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q11a. On average, how much tech time does it take to pre- provision an employee’s full disk encrypted desktop or laptop computer? US UK DE JP
< 5 minutes 25% 24% 22% 32%
5 to 10 minutes 14% 16% 24% 15%
11 to 15 minutes 9% 12% 9% 8%
16 to 20 minutes 11% 10% 12% 13%
21 to 30 minutes 10% 14% 11% 9%
31 to 40 minutes 11% 9% 7% 8%
41 to 50 minutes 11% 8% 6% 9%
51 to 60 minutes 8% 7% 8% 6%
> 1 hour 1% 1% 1% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q11b. On average, how much tech time does it take to pre- provision an employee’s unencrypted desktop or laptop computer? US UK DE JP
< 5 minutes 33% 34% 42% 39%
5 to 10 minutes 26% 24% 25% 28%
11 to 15 minutes 11% 18% 16% 15%
16 to 20 minutes 2% 8% 10% 1%
21 to 30 minutes 3% 7% 5% 2%
31 to 40 minutes 1% 1% 1% 1%
41 to 50 minutes 6% 5% 1% 8%
51 to 60 minutes 6% 2% 0% 4%
> 1 hour 12% 1% 0% 2%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q12a. On average, how much tech time does it take to stage (a.k.a. make ready for employees’ use) a desktop or laptop computer with full disk encryption? US UK DE JP
< 10 minutes 1% 2% 2% 3%
11 to 15 minutes 5% 8% 4% 5%
16 to 20 minutes 12% 16% 17% 20%
21 to 30 minutes 21% 15% 20% 17%
31 to 40 minutes 17% 10% 17% 16%
41 to 50 minutes 17% 16% 9% 8%
51 to 60 minutes 8% 6% 8% 9%
1 to 2 hours 7% 1% 8% 3%
> 2 hours 12% 26% 15% 20%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q12b. On average, how much tech time does it take to stage (a.k.a. make ready for employees’ use) an unencrypted desktop or laptop computer? US UK DE JP
< 10 minutes 10% 12% 19% 22%
11 to 15 minutes 13% 28% 24% 16%
16 to 20 minutes 22% 24% 19% 20%
21 to 30 minutes 22% 18% 15% 13%
31 to 40 minutes 18% 9% 12% 10%
41 to 50 minutes 5% 2% 4% 9%
51 to 60 minutes 7% 5% 2% 5%
1 to 2 hours 3% 3% 4% 4%
> 2 hours 0% 0% 1% 2%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q13a. On average, how much tech time does it take to perform a password reset for a user’s desktop or laptop computer with full disk encryption? Please include remote password resets in your estimation. US UK DE JP
< 5 minutes 0% 1% 0% 0%
5 to 10 minutes 14% 16% 12% 15%
11 to 15 minutes 38% 35% 32% 33%
16 to 20 minutes 21% 23% 21% 24%
21 to 30 minutes 11% 16% 15% 13%
31 to 40 minutes 5% 2% 4% 1%
41 to 50 minutes 7% 3% 9% 7%
51 to 60 minutes 3% 3% 4% 6%
1 hour 1% 1% 3% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q13b. On average, how much tech time does it take to perform a password reset for a user’s unencrypted desktop or laptop computer? Please include remote password resets in your estimation. US UK DE JP
< 5 minutes 0% 0% 0% 0%
5 to 10 minutes 18% 21% 15% 18%
11 to 15 minutes 41% 36% 29% 35%
16 to 20 minutes 23% 23% 21% 21%
21 to 30 minutes 6% 17% 18% 15%
31 to 40 minutes 4% 3% 10% 6%
41 to 50 minutes 6% 0% 5% 3%
51 to 60 minutes 1% 1% 2% 1%
> 1 hour 0% 0% 0% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q14a. On average, how much user time is incurred waiting for a password reset of their desktop or laptop computer with full disk encryption? Please include remote password resets in your estimation. US UK DE JP
< 5 minutes 10% 12% 15% 6%
5 to 10 minutes 11% 10% 21% 7%
11 to 15 minutes 12% 13% 15% 12%
16 to 20 minutes 9% 12% 13% 12%
21 to 30 minutes 18% 11% 18% 15%
31 to 40 minutes 11% 7% 5% 9%
41 to 50 minutes 10% 11% 1% 13%
51 to 60 minutes 11% 13% 5% 15%
1 to 2 hours 5% 10% 2% 10%
> 2 hours 3% 1% 5% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q14b. On average, how much user time is incurred waiting for a password reset of their unencrypted desktop or laptop computer? Please include remote password resets. US UK DE JP
< 5 minutes 14% 0% 4% 4%
5 to 10 minutes 12% 9% 11% 10%
11 to 15 minutes 14% 16% 19% 12%
16 to 20 minutes 21% 21% 23% 21%
21 to 30 minutes 10% 10% 31% 24%
31 to 40 minutes 16% 15% 7% 19%
41 to 50 minutes 1% 13% 2% 2%
51 to 60 minutes 8% 12% 3% 5%
1 to 2 hours 2% 3% 0% 3%
> 2 hours 2% 0% 0% 0%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q15a. What percent of desktop or laptop computers are re- imaged each year? US UK DE JP
None 10% 15% 16% 14%
< 10% 56% 50% 55% 50%
10 to 25% 25% 26% 25% 28%
26 to 50% 3% 5% 2% 2%
51 to 75% 5% 4% 2% 3%
76 to 100% 1% 0% 0% 3%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q15b. On average, how much tech time does it take to re- encrypt a desktop or laptop computer after re-imaging a hard disk? US UK DE JP
< 5 minutes 0% 0% 0% 0%
5 to 10 minutes 16% 21% 15% 19%
11 to 15 minutes 30% 29% 23% 28%
16 to 20 minutes 24% 20% 21% 22%
21 to 30 minutes 16% 15% 20% 16%
31 to 40 minutes 4% 2% 12% 5%
41 to 50 minutes 4% 0% 2% 0%
51 to 60 minutes 0% 1% 4% 0%
1 hour 6% 12% 3% 9%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q16a. On average, how much of an end-user’s productive time is lost during the initial encryption of the drive? Assume a hardware-based full disk encryption solution is provided. US UK DE JP
< 10 minutes 8% 1% 11% 10%
11 to 15 minutes 18% 22% 14% 15%
16 to 30 minutes 35% 38% 39% 42%
31 to 45 minutes 21% 22% 22% 19%
46 to 60 minutes 13% 11% 10% 12%
1 to 2 hours 2% 2% 2% 1%
2 to 4 hours 2% 1% 1% 1%
4 to 8 hours 1% 2% 0% 0%
> 8 hours (1 full workday) 0% 1% 1% 0%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q16b. On average, how much of an end-user’s productive time is lost during the initial encryption of the drive? Assume a software-based full disk encryption solution is provided. US UK DE JP
< 10 minutes 0% 0% 0% 0%
11 to 15 minutes 6% 4% 0% 5%
16 to 30 minutes 13% 12% 19% 10%
31 to 45 minutes 13% 14% 11% 12%
46 to 60 minutes 28% 32% 32% 34%
1 to 2 hours 18% 20% 26% 26%
2 to 4 hours 13% 11% 7% 7%
4 to 8 hours 7% 3% 4% 5%
> 8 hours (1 full workday) 2% 4% 1% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q17. On average, how much user time is incurred operating a desktop or laptop under three separate scenarios: (1) no encryption, (2) software-based encryption and (3) hardware-based encryption (SEDs)? Please estimate the time it takes each day for an average employee to start-up, shutdown and hibernate their computers during the “typical” workday.
Encryption is not deployed US UK DE JP
No time 0% 0% 0% 0%
Less than 30 seconds 11% 12% 11% 10%
31 to 60 seconds 35% 36% 36% 34%
1 to 2 minutes 24% 15% 18% 22%
2 to 3 minutes 13% 23% 20% 21%
3 to 5 minutes 11% 8% 11% 9%
5 to 10 minutes 5% 6% 4% 2%
> 10 minutes 1% 0% 0% 2%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Software-based encryption US UK DE JP
No time 0% 0% 4% 1%
Less than 30 seconds 4% 5% 3% 2%
31 to 60 seconds 8% 8% 7% 10%
1 to 2 minutes 36% 31% 30% 32%
2 to 3 minutes 21% 24% 26% 27%
3 to 5 minutes 15% 9% 10% 12%
5 to 10 minutes 7% 4% 11% 10%
> 10 minutes 9% 18% 9% 6%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Hardware-based encryption US UK DE JP
No time 3% 0% 0% 0%
Less than 30 seconds 7% 9% 17% 8%
31 to 60 seconds 36% 38% 36% 32%
1 to 2 minutes 23% 18% 20% 24%
2 to 3 minutes 15% 19% 16% 21%
3 to 5 minutes 10% 8% 7% 9%
5 to 10 minutes 3% 7% 4% 3%
> 10 minutes 3% 1% 0% 4%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q18a. Does this ever happen in your organization? A system administrator needs to gain access to an encrypted drive on a desktop or laptop computer. However, because the administrator does not have the proper credential (such as a token) to access this particular drive, he or she is required to use other secondary means to gain access. Approximately, over the past 30 days, how often has this situation happened in your organization? US UK DE JP
Never 20% 23% 32% 31%
1 to 5 58% 52% 49% 51%
6 to 10 9% 10% 5% 8%
11 to 25 4% 3% 5% 2%
26 to 50 5% 2% 1% 2%
51 to 100 2% 1% 2% 3%
More than 100 2% 3% 5% 2%
Cannot determine 0% 6% 1% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%

Part 3. Other questions

Q19. What types of stored data on disk drives (data-at-rest) are normally encrypted in your organization? Please check all that apply. US UK DE JP
Consumer data 13% 10% 18% 3%
Customer data 21% 38% 42% 45%
Employee records 21% 25% 52% 40%
Non-financial confidential documents 9% 12% 33% 36%
Financial confidential documents 32% 34% 51% 45%
Source code 4% 2% 8% 4%
Trade secrets 30% 37% 56% 42%
Other intellectual properties 20% 28% 39% 32%
Other (please specify) 1% 0% 0% 1%
Total 151% 186% 299% 249%
Q20. How important is compliance with high security standards (such as AES/FIPS 197) to your organization’s decision to select a disk encryption solution? US UK DE JP
Very important 26% 25% 40% 32%
Important 39% 35% 36% 41%
Somewhat important 15% 25% 15% 20%
Not important 12% 9% 8% 4%
Irrelevant 8% 6% 1% 3%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q21. Why does your organization encrypt data-at-rest? Please select your top two choices. US UK DE JP
Comply with state or federal/national data protection laws 36% 26% 35% 23%
Comply with self-regulatory programs such as PCI DSS, ISO, NIST and others 30% 25% 33% 40%
Minimize end-user data mishaps resulting from lost computers 25% 19% 28% 26%
Comply with vendor or business partner agreements 11% 15% 13% 27%
Avoid harms to customers resulting from data loss or theft 20% 22% 28% 21%
Minimize the cost of data breach 23% 15% 19% 15%
Minimize the affect of cyber attacks 9% 11% 14% 6%
Improve security posture 15% 28% 25% 13%
Other (please specify) 2% 1% 0% 2%
Total 171% 162% 195% 173%
Q22. In evaluating full encryption solutions for your organization, how important is each attribute listed below? Please rank the following six attributes from 1 = most important to 6 = least important to your organization. US UK DE JP
Performance/speed 1.96 2.20 2.71 2.35
Strong security 1.87 2.96 1.88 0.80
Scalability 2.77 3.93 2.63 2.91
Interoperability 4.41 4.77 3.38 3.68
Ease of use 3.67 2.23 2.83 3.27
Total cost of ownership 3.40 3.03 3.74 2.35
Average 3.01 3.19 2.86 2.56
 
Please rate the importance of each one of the following nine disk drive encryption features using the scale below the item.
Q23a. Ease of deployment: Encryption key is generated in the factory US UK DE JP
Very important 23% 25% 22% 21%
Important 32% 30% 34% 29%
Somewhat important 30% 29% 26% 28%
Not important 12% 10% 12% 14%
Irrelevant 3% 6% 6% 8%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q23b. Transparency: Once unlocked, it functions as a regular drive US UK DE JP
Very important 25% 24% 21% 24%
Important 31% 25% 34% 30%
Somewhat important 29% 32% 27% 26%
Not important 13% 9% 10% 15%
Irrelevant 2% 10% 7% 5%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q23c. Ease of management: Streamlines the IT process by assisting with resetting passwords, recovering devices and unattended software updating US UK DE JP
Very important 28% 25% 20% 22%
Important 31% 26% 39% 34%
Somewhat important 27% 34% 30% 25%
Not important 10% 8% 11% 10%
Irrelevant 5% 7% 0% 8%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q23d. Life-cycle costs: Lower initial and on-going costs US UK DE JP
Very important 26% 25% 21% 25%
Important 27% 24% 35% 30%
Somewhat important 24% 29% 26% 27%
Not important 13% 15% 15% 13%
Irrelevant 9% 8% 3% 5%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q23f. Disposal or re-purposing cost: Erasure made easy US UK DE JP
Very important 26% 27% 21% 27%
Important 27% 23% 42% 26%
Somewhat important 22% 28% 25% 36%
Not important 15% 16% 10% 9%
Irrelevant 10% 6% 2% 2%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q23g. Re-encryption: With self-encrypting drives, there is no need to ever re-encrypt the data US UK DE JP
Very important 26% 25% 19% 23%
Important 22% 25% 40% 28%
Somewhat important 27% 26% 29% 34%
Not important 13% 18% 12% 11%
Irrelevant 12% 7% 0% 4%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q23h. Performance: No degradation in self-encrypting drive (SED) performance US UK DE JP
Very important 26% 21% 23% 24%
Important 28% 32% 38% 26%
Somewhat important 28% 25% 27% 26%
Not important 12% 20% 12% 22%
Irrelevant 6% 3% 0% 2%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q23i. Standardization: Whole drive industry is building to the TCG/OPAL specifications US UK DE JP
Very important 26% 21% 27% 23%
Important 18% 23% 37% 23%
Somewhat important 27% 36% 28% 36%
Not important 11% 15% 5% 14%
Irrelevant 18% 5% 3% 3%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q23j. Compatibility with other security software and encryption key management platforms US UK DE JP
Very important 21% 28% 25% 26%
Important 24% 22% 33% 30%
Somewhat important 35% 34% 28% 25%
Not important 12% 14% 9% 13%
Irrelevant 8% 2% 5% 6%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Please rate your level of agreement with each one of the following statements about self-encrypting drives using the scale below the item. In comparison to software-encrypted drives, self-encrypting drives . . .
Q24a. Prevent end-user tampering or disablement of encryption feature. US UK DE JP
Strongly agree 30% 26% 35% 22%
Agree 27% 23% 30% 26%
Unsure 28% 31% 23% 36%
Disagree 13% 14% 9% 11%
Strongly disagree 2% 6% 3% 5%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q24b. Make it easier for managing encryption and authentication keys. US UK DE JP
Strongly agree 33% 29% 34% 23%
Agree 29% 19% 32% 29%
Unsure 28% 30% 21% 34%
Disagree 10% 14% 6% 6%
Strongly disagree 0% 8% 6% 8%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q24c. Provide a faster setup time because no initial encryption is required. US UK DE JP
Strongly agree 34% 21% 38% 19%
Agree 30% 24% 26% 24%
Unsure 24% 29% 24% 33%
Disagree 12% 15% 12% 9%
Strongly disagree 0% 12% 0% 15%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q24d. Provide greater interoperability based on industry standards versus unique chipset and processor solutions. US UK DE JP
Strongly agree 32% 23% 36% 24%
Agree 23% 22% 29% 26%
Unsure 28% 30% 24% 37%
Disagree 11% 20% 9% 9%
Strongly disagree 6% 5% 2% 4%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q24e. Improve portability because there is no system-level dependency. US UK DE JP
Strongly agree 30% 25% 28% 23%
Agree 30% 23% 28% 24%
Unsure 31% 36% 25% 38%
Disagree 7% 13% 12% 11%
Strongly disagree 2% 2% 7% 4%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q24f. Improve system performance because the encryption workload is moved off the processor and chipset and onto the drive. US UK DE JP
Strongly agree 30% 24% 34% 24%
Agree 30% 25% 29% 22%
Unsure 24% 30% 21% 37%
Disagree 7% 14% 11% 7%
Strongly disagree 9% 7% 5% 9%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q24g. Hardware-based (full disk) encryption provides a higher level of security than software-based full disk encryption. US UK DE JP
Strongly agree 29% 29% 34% 27%
Agree 23% 22% 28% 25%
Unsure 24% 32% 21% 36%
Disagree 16% 17% 12% 11%
Strongly disagree 8% 0% 6% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Q24h. File and folder-level encryption is an alternative to full disk encryption. US UK DE JP
Strongly agree 32% 30% 33% 16%
Agree 30% 23% 31% 29%
Unsure 23% 29% 22% 37%
Disagree 10% 16% 13% 15%
Strongly disagree 6% 2% 2% 3%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
Q24i. File and folder-level encryption is an attractive addition to full disk encryption. US UK DE JP
Strongly agree 26% 20% 33% 22%
Agree 24% 23% 30% 24%
Unsure 27% 26% 26% 29%
Disagree 13% 16% 9% 16%
Strongly disagree 10% 15% 3% 9%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%

Part 5. Your role and organization

D1. What organizational level best describes your current position? US UK DE JP
Senior Executive 1% 2% 0% 1%
Vice President 1% 0% 0% 6%
Director 17% 12% 15% 14%
Manager 23% 26% 24% 24%
Supervisor 19% 25% 19% 15%
Technician 30% 28% 34% 29%
Staff 5% 4% 2% 3%
Contractor 3% 3% 6% 7%
Other 1% 0% 1% 0%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
D2. Check the Primary Person you or your IT security leader reports to within the organization. US UK DE JP
CEO/Executive Committee 1% 0% 0% 0%
Chief Financial Officer 1% 2% 0% 3%
General Counsel 2% 0% 1% 5%
Chief Information Officer 56% 60% 58% 61%
Chief Information Security Officer 21% 17% 18% 15%
Compliance Officer 6% 7% 9% 8%
Human Resources VP 0% 3% 2% 0%
Chief Security Officer 3% 2% 2% 0%
Data Center Management 2% 5% 5% 4%
Chief Risk Officer 7% 4% 5% 5%
Other 1% 0% 0% 0%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
D3. Total years of relevant experience (mean years) US UK DE JP
Total years of IT or security experience 9.82 10.03 9.56 8.99
Total years in current position years 5.6 4.89 6.07 5.55
D4. What industry best describes your organization’s industry focus? US UK DE JP
Agriculture & food services 1% 0% 0% 3%
Communications 3% 0% 0% 0%
Consumer products 3% 6% 6% 5%
Defense 2% 2% 6% 7%
Education & research 4% 7% 3% 6%
Energy & utilities 5% 2% 4% 1%
Entertainment & media 3% 7% 5% 1%
Financial services 16% 13% 18% 15%
Health & pharmaceuticals 11% 14% 12% 10%
Hospitality 4% 6% 4% 4%
Industrial 5% 6% 9% 9%
Public sector 10% 15% 9% 7%
Retail 9% 6% 5% 8%
Services 8% 8% 9% 7%
Technology & software 7% 5% 4% 10%
Transportation 4% 4% 4% 6%
Other 5% 0% 2% 1%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
 
D5. Where are your employees located? (Check all that apply): US UK DE JP
North America 100% 69% 67% 89%
Europe 67% 100% 100% 58%
Middle East & Africa 39% 40% 38% 32%
Asia-Pacific 54% 59% 59% 100%
Latin America (including Mexico) 48% 46% 43% 40%
Total 308% 315% 308% 319%
 
D6. What is the worldwide headcount of your organization? US UK DE JP
< 100 12% 11% 10% 16%
100 to 500 11% 18% 10% 19%
501 to 1,000 26% 28% 19% 29%
1,001 to 5,000 18% 18% 31% 10%
5,001 to 10,000 16% 12% 14% 12%
10,001 to 25,000 8% 7% 9% 8%
25,001 to 75,000 5% 4% 3% 2%
> 75,000 4% 2% 4% 4%
Total 100% 100% 100% 100%
Extrapolated value 8,920 6,460 8,277 7,154

  • 1 In the context of this paper, full disk encryption means that every bit of data that goes on a disk is encrypted.
  • 2 See Perceptions about Self-Encrypting Drives: A Study of IT Practitioners. Trusted Computing Group and Ponemon Institute, May 2011.
  • 3 Our comparative analysis of software and hardware FDE is based on a sample of 1,335 knowledgeable respondents in four countries. One-third of respondents say their organizations are presently deploying hardware-based FDE. A further extrapolation shows six (6) percent of all desktops or laptops issued by respondents’ organizations contain OPAL compliant hardware-based FDE or SEDs. These use statistics are consistent with an earlier study (see Footnote 2).
  • 4 Ibid. Footnote 2.
  • 5 Survey responses used in this reanalysis were collected in our original TCO study published in July 2012.
  • 6 This procedure allowed respondents to temporarily leave the survey and return to the survey window at any time, thus permitting them to stop and re-start the survey without losing any items already completed. Respondents could re-start as many times as deemed necessary to collect all the relevant facts.
  • 7 See The TCO for Full Disk Encryption: Studies in the US, UK, Germany & Japan. WinMagic and Ponemon Institute, July 2012.

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