Full Disk Encryption, UEFI, Secure Boot and Device Guard

It has been a while since I have written about UEFI, Secure Boot and their impact on Full Disk Encryption (FDE) pre-boot authentication (PBA) so it’s time for an update on what is new in this area, but first here is a recap because this is a bit of an arcane technical subject. UEFI stands for “Unified Extensible Firmware Interface”. The UEFI specification defines a standard model for the interface between personal-computer operating systems and platform firmware.   It provides a standard environment for booting an operating system and running pre-boot applications such as the PBA for FDE.   It replaces the traditional legacy BIOS interface that was used with Windows 7 and older systems.   Now that Windows 10 is being widely adopted I expect to see UEFI used on almost all new machines.

Spring 2014 UEFI Plugfest

A colleague and I attended the Spring 2014 UEFI Plugfest in Seattle earlier this month. It was well worth attending as we had the opportunity to test and have one on one conversations with: Microsoft, Intel, the PC OEMs including HP, Lenovo, Dell, and of course the BIOS companies AMI, Insyde, and Phoenix. It was my second year in a row attending, and the third for my colleague, so we are now getting to see how things develop and change over time.

SecureDoc 6.2 is here!

As we teased last week, we have been gearing for a launch today and that launch is SecureDoc 6.2. Now, it may not seem like a significant step from 6.1 to 6.2, but it’s more than just what’s in the latest edition of our data encryption and security solution.

Windows 8 is here! Now what?

As someone that’s worked in IT for the better part of 14 years, I’ve seen my fair share of product launches. When it comes to operating systems, it’s always a cyclical engine; big flurry of attention at launch followed by mixed reaction to the product.